Canal Walk and Reviewing the Week

Looking back at my walk this week along Swansea Canal at Clydach, I hope you can enjoy both the images and the short soundscape. The work that Swansea Canal Society are doing to maintain and restore this beautiful waterway is well worth it and it is clear that many people enjoy and benefit from it.

Play the soundscape below and enjoy my selection of images from through the week as you listen.

Swansea Canal at Clydach

Canal Soundscape 

If viewing this in an email, to see the sound player you will need to visit the blog – please click the post title to view the full post.

Back at the Beginning

As I arrived back at the starting point of my walk this week along Swansea Canal, the patterns of rippling water again attracted my attention. I took more shots of them than this but have managed to refrain from posting them.

More images from this walk can be seen on Instagram and/or the StillWalks Facebook page and Twitter.

Swansea Canal-35

 

Working Patterns

Pattern is all around us but sometimes it is more noticeable than others. Earlier on my walk this week I focused on the textures around me. However, it was the patterns that were in my sights for these shots.

You may think that I have an unnatural interest in barbed wire – and you may be right! If you would like to see where this interest comes from, please visit the fibre page on my other website – alastair-duncan.com (There is something weird going on with the home page menu on this site which I will sort out asap).

More images from this walk can be seen on Instagram and/or the StillWalks Facebook page and Twitter.

Swansea Canal-30

Turning Point

The starting point for my walk this week alongside Swansea Canal, was where the River Tawe loops tightly round right next to the canal which is elevated above the river. The turning point for my walk on this section at Clydach, is where the Tawe loops back to the canal again. One of the points about any canal is that they provide a more direct route than a meandering river.

It was good to be able to look down on the river again before turning back and retracing my steps by the canal. I may have been returning the way I had come but walking any route in the opposite direction gives a different view, a new perspective on the surroundings.

In the last image on this Sunday morning, men from Swansea Canal Society can be seen at work on the lock I passed earlier. By the time I reached them the path was quite busy, not only with their activity, but with cyclists and walkers as well – an ever changing environment.

River Tawe

Working on the canal

If viewing this in an email, to see the sound player you will need to visit the blog – please click the post title to view the full post.

Canal People

There are many people that use Swansea Canal – perhaps not on the canal itself, but alongside it on the towpath. Walkers, joggers and cyclists – adults and children alike enjoy many aspects of the canal. And then of course there are the birds, ducks, dogs and cats and no doubt a million insects too.

The Swansea Canal Society clearly do an excellent job of taking care of the canal as well as restoring it where possible.

At this point on my walk this week, I was passing Coed Gwilym Park. The canal has left the industrial area of Clydach with The Mond Nickel Works and is heading up the valley towards Pontardawe. The houses and gardens have changed, Spring is starting to show  and the canal society is advertising itself and looking for new members.

Swansea Canal art work

Canal Sounds

If viewing this in an email, to see the sound player you will need to visit the blog – please click the post title to view the full post.

The Textures of Swansea Canal

From liquid smooth through crusty and tatty to razor sharp, the range of textures I spotted on my walk along Swansea canal was wide,  to say nothing of the colour and pattern, light and shade that created a natural art exhibition for me.

The water of the canal may have reflected the colour in the sky on this beautiful morning, but it certainly did not reflect the texture of the barbed wire fence round the Mond Nickel Works.

And there was pattern to be seen in the reflection of light from the water under one of the bridges and a very crusty texture on the pipe structures also crossing the canal.

Canal Reflection

My Walk this Week – Along the Canal

Since visiting various sections of Swansea Canal a couple of years ago, I have meant to return to the section which runs through Clydach, just a few miles from Swansea in South Wales. Finally getting a convenient opportunity, I took one of my cameras and my small recorder and though of my walk as a recce for a StillWalks production in the future.

My walk this week illustrates this recce walk – where necessary I used my iPhone with its wider angle lens.

The walk starts by the canal where it meets a loop of the River Tawe. However, the first shot below shows the water of the canal flowing into the Clydach river before it joins the Tawe on the other side of the canal and flows on down to Swansea.

Swansea Canal falling into Clydach River

Swansea Canal and River Tawe

Swansea Canal

Winter Walk Soundscape – Reviewing the Week

Crossing the dam at Lower Lliw Reservoir ends my walk this week. I have made a selection of the photos posted through the week which you could view while listening to a short soundscape of the walk. The full production video for this walk is about twice the length at nine minutes and is a part of the StillWalks at Lliw collection.

The StillWalks at Lliw collection is available here to buy as a download or on disc.

Lliw Lower Reservoir

Lliw Reservoir Soundscape

If viewing this in an email, to see the sound player you will need to visit the blog – please click the post title to view the full post.

Fun and Games and a Cup of Tea

Lliw Reservoir is a popular place with people of all ages these days. There is evidence below of the fact that it is as popular with children as it is with adults. And the fact that there is a nice cafe there is no doubt an added attraction but many go there for walks and never get a cuppa.

Whether people are there for a walk or a cup of tea is not really important – I simply like the fact that people get out there and enjoy the sights and sounds of the place.  It is certainly a change of environment from the city or even to village.

mini snowmen

walker

children playing in snow

Snow Going

Even towards the end of my walk round Lower Lliw Reservoir, the thaw was minimal. But as the snow gently melted new shapes and patterns were revealed. I particularly like the twisting twiddles of last years bracken.

ferns and snow

ferns and snow

leaves in winter