Under the Mountains

In a place like Corris, situated in the deep valleys amongst or under the mountains in Wales, there is no horizon to be seen. Seeing as how I love trees so much and they cover the mountains on all sides, I shouldn’t have a problem with this, and I don’t!

Recently I was at an artist’s talk – Lee Williams at the Elysium Gallery in Swansea – where he was exploring the notion that we are affected by our surrounding environment. This is a subject I have thought about for many years but it is hard to come to any definitive conclusions about whether or not the topographical element of our living environments influence the way we are or the way we behave as there are always so many other contributing factors. Those mentioned in Lee’s discourse at the link above relate to Port Talbot which has the best and worst of worlds in its beautiful mountains next to the sea and its heavy industry and pollution.

It could be argued that the people of Corris, while enjoying the wonderful moubtain-scape of their surroundings, also have to suffer what most would consider an abnormal amount of rainfall. Ah well, you can’t have it all I guess.

cemetery in the mountains

cemetery in the mountains

If viewing this in an email, please click the post title to see other photos in this post, thank you.

Trolley Cemetery and a New View of Drawing

Decaying with time, these old trolleys create a strange cemetery in the mouth of the River Tawe, Swansea.

Those that already follow this blog will know that there is more to come throughout this week to tell the story of a recent walk in the docks/marina area of Swansea.

The walk was the second Mission Gallery Walk and Draw with Sarah Abbott that I have taken part in. On this occasion, while I did a little sketching, most of my drawing was with my DSLR camera, iPhone and small edirol sound recorder.

Having read that the winner of the Jerwood Drawing Prize this year was sound artist  Alison Carlier, I felt that my description of drawing with my camera and sound recorder while out on pre-production recce walks for StillWalks videos, is perfectly valid.

With The Big Draw continuing throughout this month, perhaps it is an appropriate time to consider and enjoy the broadening definition of drawing.

trolleys in sand

trolley in sand

Old fence section

trolley in sand

A Pirate Laid To Rest

The skull and crossbones gravestone is just one of the things that makes the old graveyard at Kirkandrews on the Galloway coast in SW Scotland is a fascinating place.

There are thousands of wrecks around the coastline of Britain but pirates did not usually merit a marked grave in the local cemetery. This one must have held some honour amongst the locals!

There are a number of other interesting gravestones in the cemetery, some of which have faces, others have intriguing patterns and motifs.

pirate's gravestone

Looking Back

The reflections in these puddles and the subject matter of the Cathays Cemetery made me think that while putting the blog posts together for this week, I have mostly been looking back, if only to Saturday – so now to look forward!

Despite the cold on Saturday, I really liked this cemetery and I hope that you can see from the previous images through the week, that it has many different aspects to it. I must visit again in the late Spring or Summer to enjoy it in better conditions.

Cathays Cemetery

Cathays Cemetery

Cathays Cemetery

Cathays Cemetery

Cathays Cemetery

Cathays Cemetery

On a different note – sometimes, as on this occasion, I compile a few posts all at the same time and scheduled them to go out through the week. It was been a pleasure to do so this time to the music of Carla Bley (have fun on her website :-)). Anyone else enjoy her music?

The Audience and the Districts

These graves look like they have an excellent view of the event – whatever that may be! They make me think of a concert in the park where everyone brings a picnic and enjoys the event from deck chairs. In Britain they would have brought umbrellas as well 🙂

Cathays Cemetery in Cardiff has many aspects to it.

Cathays Cemetery

The Audience

Cathays Cemetery

Some hide away

Some prefer to be more private and hide away amongst the greenery.

This cemetery has it all, even a “downtown” area with sky scrapers!

Cathays Cemetery

Downtown at the cemetery

Tomb of the Bishop – Cathays Cemetery, Cardiff

Bishop John Cuthbert Hedley was quite a guy if you judge by the stature of his tomb in Cathays Cemetery. I wonder if he would get such a piece of architecture these days? (see Monday’s post, “When was the last time . . . “)

tomb

The Tomb of the Bishop John Cuthbert Hedley

tomb

The Tomb of the Bishop

Start of the Tour – Cathays Cemetery

The prompt to this weeks blog posts were the Angels in yesterdays post.

So, going back to the beginning, todays images are of the entrance to the cemetery which, although in need of some maintenance, is still an impressive structure and suggests, even before you enter, the size and importance of the cemetery.

All photos taken on my iPhone.

Cathays Cemetery

Cathays Cemetery Entrance

Cathays Cemetery, Cardiff

Inside the secondary entrance to the cemetery

Entrance detail

Entrance detail

Cathays Cemetery

Strange place for a tree!

When was the last time . . .

. . . you saw tombstones on this scale made in recent years?

I am going to be looking around Cathays Cemetery in Cardiff this week. By that I mean I had a walk around the cemetery on Saturday (in the bitter cold!) and one of the the first things that struck me was the scale of these angels and some of the other tombstones from the past. Ahh! They don’t make them like that any more. 🙂

All photos taken on my iPhone.

Angel

Angel

Angel

Angel

imperial

Less Angelic, more imperial