A Visit to Middlesbrough – Sculpture?

Next to the Anish Kapoor sculpture, “Tenemos” (featured in yesterday’s post), are other “sculptures” which, although functional in their design, are fascinating and attractive in their own way.

The textures, colours and patterns of paint and rust are further enhanced by their juxtaposition with Kapoor’s work. And that, of course, is a part of the purpose of art – to help us see, understand and appreciate what is around us.

I wonder what it is like inside that crane?!

Middlesbrough crane

Tenemos and Crane

Tenemos and Crane

IMG_7369

crane

Middlesbrough crane

IMG_7383

IMG_7341

broken windows

Watching

It seems to me that these stones are an audience in the circle watching the tide –

Watching

Watching

– but really it is their balancing act that is the attraction!

Balancing Act

Balancing Act

With each StillWalk I produce, I select nine or ten images as stand alone shots and make them available for purchase. These are two more from the “Coastal Walk” in Spring in South West Scotland. The photos are available to buy at PhotoBox.

Waiting

Looking out to sea and waiting – that is what these “standing stones” appear to be doing!

My StillWalk, “Coastal Walk“, in Scotland in the Spring features these shots. The balanced stones looked as though they were just biding their time and waiting for some spectacular event – or perhaps they were just soaking up the sun while they could.

Sculpture on the Beach

Sculpture on the Beach

Patterns in the Sand

Patterns in the Sand

Exhibiting Light 3 – The Absorption of Black Holes

Light plays an important part in all art work and its display. Despite the display and this photograph revealing the shadows and surfaces of this piece of work by Duncan Ayscough, when seeing it last week at Craft in the Bay, Cardiff, it was difficult to describe just what the ceramic form was doing with the light in the gallery other than absorbing it – like a Black Hole.

The photo cannot do it justice – the matt black surface seemed to negate the existence of light and in other pieces (not those shown here), the form seemed to be a “normal” vessel but when taking a closer look, we realised that the black surface of the interior was deceiving us! If I had taken a closer look still, I fear I too would have been absorbed into that Black Hole.

Fascinating work and well worth a visit if you’re in the area – or even if you’re not! This work must be new as it does not appear on his website yet.

Duncan Ayscough

Duncan Ayscough

Duncan Ayscough

Duncan Ayscough

Exhibiting Light 2

The first photo here is not an exhibit at the second gallery we visited last week – the Howard Garden Gallery at Cardiff Met University. The video below the photo was an installation art work which had to be viewed in a dark room. If you want to be able to see the video, I suspect you will also need to darken your room.

Personally, I liked the crack in the dark by the entrance more than the piece itself but I enjoyed the rest of this exhibition by Avtarjeet Dhanjal. More info on the show can be found here – hmmm, just discovered it finishes today so here is a quote from I’m on that web page.

“When growing up in the Panjab, India, I was not aware there was such a thing called ‘Art’; though my mother decorated our house with beautiful wall murals using clay. It was never called Art. One could find many other examples of beautiful objects of daily use; those enhanced the quality of life. To hold a beautiful object on your hand, or to stand facing a unique work of art, one feels a delight whether one has any formal education in aesthetics or not. This is considered the intrinsic worth of a work of art” – Avtarjeet Dhanjal.

Crack in the Dark

Crack in the Dark

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

This trough was half filled with water but because the blue plastic itself was shiny and reflective, it was almost impossible to see the water. The installation shown in the video above also used “invisible” water.

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

Exhibiting Light 1

We have been to a few galleries lately and in one way or another, light played an important part in each one. Light may always be relevant to art but in these exhibits, the artists had used light as an important and “material” part of the work.

These first shots are from an exhibition called “Difference Engine: Accumulator II” at Oriel Myrddin in Carmarthen. I wasn’t told not to photograph, so I went ahead (on my phone) and feel justified by advertising both the gallery and the artists. More information on the show can be found on the gallery website.

There were other works in the exhibition as well as these and it was well worth the visit but I particularly enjoyed the use of light in these pieces.

Oriel Myrddin
Oriel Myrddin
Oriel Myrddin
Oriel Myrddin

Nature Taking Over

We are a week into 2013 now so a belated Happy New Year to all.

Whilst away over the New Year I took a few photos that I hope to use in the near future. They help to show that if we were not around anymore, it would not take long for nature to recover from our antics on this planet. Sometimes (in late Spring usually) I think I’d only have to blink and the bushes and trees would pounce – these images are, perhaps, preparation for that pounce!

Suburbanature 1

Suburbanature 1

Suburbanature 2

Suburbanature 2

Suburbanature 3

Suburbanature 3

Suburbanature 4

Suburbanature 4

Speaking of what we do as humans, some of what has been produced can be seen at MIMA, Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art, where I saw two great exhibitions –  Jannis Kounellis’ Work Unwrapped and Liliane Lijn: Cosmic Dramas – both well worth a visit if you are in the area.