What I Like – Image Composition

When selecting images to post on this blog I try to pick photos that I like for a range of different reasons – composition, texture, pattern – perhaps most importantly, how well they depict my memory of the place they represent.

My main reason for choosing the images below is composition. In the first shot I particularly like the combined shapes of the light – the oblique oval of reflected light on the water of the canal and the quarter oval of light in the sky. The image, for me, is not so much about the reflection of land on water as the abstract shapes of light and dark, hence my rendering of the second image.

The composition of the last photo has nothing to do with manipulation. This was simply the way the reflection appeared with the apparent shape mask being created by the reflection of the wall and underside of a bridge over the canal. The shot was a little underexposed but this made for a more dynamic and abstract composition.

Complementary images are posted on Instagram through the week and can also be seen on the sidebar of the StillWalks blog.

Tennant Canal

Tennant Canal Composition

abstract reflection

 

 

Reviewing the Week 2

The last of my images for this week is a final view of Penarth Pier against the rising sun on a grey day. Also featured is a slideshow of the images I have posted through the week. I would also like to connect to another blog this week – that of Lightscapes Nature Photography. I get frustrated when I see overworked photography with that slickly unreal appearance and no texture – it seems to be used a lot commercially. However, that is not the case with Kerry Mark Leibowitz’s photography of landscapes and on top of that, there is good reading and advice to had as well.

Penarth Pier against the morning sun

Repeating Pattern and Railing Art

You can find these railings with their reflection of wave forms and froth in front of the Italian Gardens on Penarth Esplanade in South Wales – a pleasant place to sit with a good view of the Bristol Channel.

Railing Art

Railing Art

Columns and Context

I like the arrangement of these lighting columns in Cardiff Bay but to put them properly in context you need to look at the wider picture at the bottom of this post.

I thought the dark lump on the glass discs in the second image was something nasty but on closer inspection, it looks like it is a lump of moss . . . so that’s one for the Moss Appreciation Society!

Cardiff Columns

Cardiff Bay Architecture-14

Cardiff Columns

Building Materials – Bronze and Slate

The materials used in the building of the Wales Millennium Centre in Cardiff Bay are not the only impressive aspect of this piece of architecture. The design by Jonathan Adams seems to defy gravity with the impression of a huge overhanging weight at the front of the building.

The contrasting materials of bronze and slate complement each other beautifully both in colour and texture. The setting within the “arena” at the centre of Cardiff Bay allows enough space for the scale and for people to stand back and take in what makes for a great piece of architectural art.

Wales Millennium Centre

Wales Millennium Centre

Cold Steel or Molten Metal?

The water flowing down over the huge stainless steel monolith in Cardiff Bay looks in close up like it could be the steel itself , solidified after a melt down. These images make the patterns of water look like solid metal, but I have done nothing with the colour – it is purely the effect of clear water flowing over cold steel. Any light or colour is a reflection of the grey sky. I guess if the weather had been warmer, the colour may have been warmer too.

Click the lower image to enlarge and see the patterns in more detail. Just to confirm, these are colour images!

These images can also bee seen on Leanne Cole’s Photography blog along with lots more “Monochrome Madness”.

water flow detail

Cardiff Bay Architecture-8Click the image to enlarge.

 

Patterns in Water – Slo-Mo Flow

The patterns in the water flowing down the steel monolith structure in Cardiff Bay look like they could be parts of an abstract jigsaw. The slow exposure shot below was not an easy one to get as I didn’t have a tripod with me. I did my best though and like the combination of textures and the patterns that show up as a result of the (apparently) faster flowing water.

water flow patterns

slo mo flow

Urban Flow – Water on Steel

The architecture of art or the art of architecture? Which is it? Water flows on the steel monolith structure in Cardiff Bay. The people living in the apartments behind must have a different view to most of us to wake up to in the morning!

flowing water on steel

water flow on steel

Metal Monolith

It’s a while since I was in Cardiff bay when the water is flowing down this shiny steel structure in Cardiff Bay. It is the metal monolith under which Torchwood had it’s headquarters.

It was a pretty grey day but I was pleased to have my camera with me – the patterns the water makes can be mesmerising. More of those to come shortly and some extra shots from my iPhone can be seen on Instagram – these can also be seen in the sidebar of the StillWalks blog.

Monolith of water

monolith of water