Getting Stuck on the Worm’s Head

Firstly I should say that this has not happened to me! However, people getting cut off by the tide and stuck on the Worm’s Head at the end of the Gower Peninsula is a regular occurrence and one which requires the RNLI to launch their boat from the Port Eynon station to rescue them. During last month’s Taste of Gower walk we called in at the local RNLI station for a talk by one of their members.

taste-of-gower-port-eynon-walk-35

The next ToG walk is this coming Friday and will be at Rhossili from where we will be able to look out to the Worm’s Head as we walk out along the cliffs. This is also a fundraising walk for The Old Mill Foundation.

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My Walk this Week – Port Eynon

My walk this week is from the last Taste of Gower outing to Port Eynon on the Gower Peninsula.It was a bright day with a bit of a breeze as can be heard on the sound clips I’ll be posting. We gathered at the Captain’s Table as a starting point for the walk and I enjoyed seeing the late display of wildflowers as we approached the beach to amble, stride or march along the sand towards Horton.

Port Eynon

We had all come prepared for changeable weather but were lucky to keep the sunshine for almost the whole of the walk. We weren’t the only ones enjoying it either!

The next ToG walk will be this Friday at Rhossili – details here.

 

Taste of Gower, Penclawdd – Reviewing the Walk

To mark the end of each Taste of Gower walk we visit a local cafe, hence the name “Taste of Gower”. The Gower Landscape Partnership pays for the teas and coffees but there are always many other good things to be eaten as well, and that was no less the case for the Cariad Cafe in Penclawdd as it is for any of the other Taste of Gower walk locations.

The next Taste of Gower walk will be at Port Eynon on Friday 30th September (that’s next week). Details can be found here.

Cariad Cafe

Cup of tea time at Cariad Cafe

Click play button below and then the first of the thumbnail images to view selected photos from the past week’s posts in sequence.

Taste of Gower – Penclawdd Soundscape

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Perspective on the Landscape

Looking across to the Gower Peninsula from Cefn Drum shows the Loughor Estuary and the dip of the rock strata made up of Pennant Sandstone on top with coal measures below, Carboniferous Limestone and lastly Old Red Sandstone. It is the Old Red Sandstone that forms the ridge of Cefn Bryn on the Gower and further north, the upland of Mynydd Du. Being on top of Cefn Drum we are right in between these two.

Loughor Estuary from Cefn Drum

Loughor Estuary from Cefn Drum

The sounds on top of Cefn Drum are typical of this landscape with a warm wind blowing from the south west and the skylarks entertaining us above.

On top of Cefn Drum

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Return Route – Reviewing the Walk

Looking back on my walk this week with the Taste of Gower group at Llanmadoc, we were very lucky with the weather. We saw both sunshine and clouds over the beautiful open space of the beach at Whitford Point with the old Victorian lighthouse not quite clear of the tide. Having said that, one of the main reasons we have such a green and luscious land in Wales is the amount of rainfall we get. It is less predictable where it is going to fall these days and looking again at the dark clouds and sun bleached beach, that is why I say we were so lucky not to be rained on until the end of the walk.

Country lane

return route

My soundscape for this walk is about the same length as usual (around 4 mins) but I could easily have made it twice that length or more. I may decide to produce a StillWalks video from the photos and sounds I have collected on this walk but it will have to wait in line with the others I have not yet post produced.

Llanmadoc Walk Soundscape

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Underfoot

Moving up from the beach at Whitford Point my walk this week with the Taste of Gower walkers meandered through the woods to continue this circular walk from Llanmadoc on the northern tip of the Gower Peninsula.

The ground underfoot was now mostly a soft carpet of pine needles and so for those walking barefoot (just one, not me), the transition from the sand of the beach would have been a relatively comfortable one. I was tempted to go barefoot myself, remembering the experience being described by Nan Shepherd and Robert MacFarlane in their books as one which puts you in contact with the ground (literally) in a way that walking in boots cannot, however sensitive and sympathetic you are to the land.

woodland path

Woodland Footpath

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My Walk this Week – Taste of Gower, Llanmadoc

My walk this week is another Taste of Gower walk organised by Steve Lancey with the Gower Landscapes Partnership. The walk started from the village of Llanmadoc on the northern tip of the Gower Peninsula. The weather was fine and still but with storms threatening.

We headed down to the beach which took us past the woodland we would return through and the dramatic rock outcrops that are a feature of the place – worth climbing too, but not today.

Llanmadoc Walk-1

I’ll get onto the beach in tomorrow’s post but in the meantime I have included a short sound clip of a blackbird and a cockerel welcoming us on this typical Gower lane.

Morning Cockerel

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Descending Through the Wild Woods

Descending from the hill at Weobley Castle to the level of the salt marshes on my circular walk this week on the northern edge of the Gower Peninsula, we passed through some woodland which was filled with wild flowers.

It is always good to see bluebells and it is also good to see wild garlic. Even though the scent can be almost overwhelming at times, I love both the sight and the smell garlic in the woods.

Bluebells

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