Blind Patterns

During a quiet time in the Sights and Sounds of the Countryside exhibition (see previous posts), I started looking around in more detail at the exhibition space (not the exhibition itself).

The sun was not shining and so the patterns of light on the floor in the room were not there (see previous post). Over the next couple of days I am going to put up what I found instead. NB This is not b & w photography Р the images are a little darker than reality but I thought they were more atmospheric this way. I tried them in b & w but preferred this white balance.

Blind Patterns 1

Blind Patterns 2

Blind Patterns 3

Blind Detail 1 Blind Detail 2 Blind Detail 3

Shining a Light on Swansea

These photos are more about the light than they are about Swansea, except that they were taken from the top of Kilvey Hill, an urban woodland that is surrounded by the city.

It was a beautiful evening when I took these pictures but even then the clouds were heralding yet another a change in the weather. Constant change may be something we have to accept in the weather these days, but fortunately there can be as much beauty in those changes as in the pleasure we feel in the sunshine – when we get it.

There are many more beautiful images to be seen from Kilvey Hill on the StillWalks Photography website.

Sunlight and Clouds Sunlight and Clouds Kilvey Hill Fence Foxglove

Late Evening Light

These were the first shorts I took during my late evening walk down on the marshes. I enjoyed the walk and doing the photography – say no more ūüôā

That After Sun Glow

That After Sun Glow

That After Sun Glow

Vapour Trail

Sunset Reflection

Bull’s Eye

I wasn’t the only one out for a late evening stroll on the marshes last weekend.

You can click the images to enlarge but if you could zoom in on the originals, you would see just how grainy they are from the high ISO.

First shot – ISO3200, f4.5, 1/30. Second shot – ISO3200, f5, 1/30

Horns in the Night

Horns in the Night

Bull's Eye

Bull’s Eye

Going Home

Going Home

Exhibiting Light 3 – The Absorption of Black Holes

Light plays an important part in all art work and its display. Despite the display and this photograph revealing the shadows and surfaces of this piece of work by Duncan Ayscough, when seeing it last week at Craft in the Bay, Cardiff, it was difficult to describe just what the ceramic form was doing with the light in the gallery other than absorbing it – like a Black Hole.

The photo cannot do it justice – the matt black surface seemed to negate the existence of light and in other pieces (not those shown here), the form seemed to be a “normal” vessel but when taking a closer look, we realised that the black surface of the interior was deceiving us! If I had taken a closer look still, I fear I too would have been absorbed into that Black Hole.

Fascinating work and well worth a visit if you’re in the area – or even if you’re not! This work must be new as it does not appear on his website yet.

Duncan Ayscough

Duncan Ayscough

Duncan Ayscough

Duncan Ayscough

Exhibiting Light 2

The first photo here is not an exhibit at the second gallery we visited last week – the Howard Garden Gallery at Cardiff Met University. The video below the photo was an installation art work which had to be viewed in a dark room. If you want to be able to see the video, I suspect you will also need to darken your room.

Personally, I liked the crack in the dark by the entrance more than the piece itself but I enjoyed the rest of this exhibition by¬†Avtarjeet Dhanjal. More info on the show can be found here¬†– hmmm, just discovered it finishes today so here is a quote from I’m on that web page.

‚ÄúWhen growing up in the Panjab, India, I was not aware there was such a thing called ‚ÄėArt‚Äô; though my mother decorated our house with beautiful wall murals using clay. It was never called Art. One could find many other examples of beautiful objects of daily use; those enhanced the quality of life. To hold a beautiful object on your hand, or to stand facing a unique work of art, one feels a delight whether one has any formal education in aesthetics or not. This is considered the intrinsic worth of a work of art‚ÄĚ – Avtarjeet Dhanjal.

Crack in the Dark

Crack in the Dark

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

This trough was half filled with water but because the blue plastic itself was shiny and reflective, it was almost impossible to see the water. The installation shown in the video above also used “invisible” water.

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

Avtarjeet Dhanjal

Light is Everything

Sunlight or cloud, rain or mist – the weather conditions influence, no, create the available light for photography.

A few weeks ago I was at Lliw Valley Reservoirs in the rain and took some photos on my iPhone 4s of what I described as “fence post gardens”. I posted them on the Moss Appreciation Society Facebook page with the comment that I would have to go back on a dry day to photograph them properly. The response from one group member was that moss likes, and is perhaps, at its best in the rain.

The sun was shining when I was up there last week and following my interview with BBC Radio Wales I proceeded to take some photos of the same “fence post gardens” with my Canon 550D. It was difficult to say the least! Sunlight can be very dramatic – usually in the early morning or evening, but it can also be a major problem depending on the subject matter.

I have picked out four photos that I think are not too bad from those I took on the day but it seems I am going to have to wait for a more overcast day or go there at sunrise to get some decent shots of this subject.

Getting to know the subject is also important whatever medium you are working with, and I think that it was not just the light conditions that gave me a problem. It was also time and the need to figure out the best angles. Next time I will go better informed.

Update (22/03/2013) According to a friend of my sister –

The second photo has some lichens in as well as moss- the silvery flattish ones at the front which may be a Paramelia – and probably the red and silvey grey one – also a brown cupped one in the middle- these last 2 will be Cladonia species.

Moss Garden

Moss Garden

moss

moss

Peristomes

Ghostly Tree

Ghostly Tree