iPhonography at Lliw Reservoir

Some alternative iPhone shots of Lliw Lower Reservoir. Having finished the new video collection, “StillWalks at Lliw Reservoir“, I recently had a walk there and did some iPhonography at the same time.

The photos were taken using the ProCamera app and edited in the PhotoshopExpress app on the phone and have also been posted on Instagram and EyeEm.

New StillWalks Video Collection

“StillWalks at Lliw Reservoirs” – This new collection of StillWalks videos looks at Lliw Lower Reservoir through all four seasons as well as a Spring walk to the upper reservoir. It also includes a short introduction.

Below is the introduction and a sample from the collection which is available here or can be bought at the  reservoir cafe on disc.

As with all StillWalks videos, the sounds are unique to the time and place of the walk. In the case of this collection, the location is the same in each video, albeit with a slightly different route taken each time. The sounds recorded, however, vary with the conditions and the acoustics of the surrounding landscape are affected by changing weather conditions to give different effects to permanent features such as flowing water or background ambience.

Why buy a StillWalks video or video collection?

 

Green On Green

Sometimes in Wales, there is just so much green! It’s amazing 🙂

green on green

river

All StillWalks videos are available to buy as High Definition (HD) downloads. Just click on the Shop drop down menu button. Or you can pay what you like for this video (normal price £3.00) with the donate button below and I will send you a link to download this featured video in HD. Please allow up to 24 hours for delivery of the download link.

Why pay for a StillWalks video? See five good reasons below.

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Five good reasons to buy a StillWalks video:

  • High Quality Videos 
  • Anytime, anywhere
  • Therapy at your fingertips
  • Watching, Walking and Listening 
  • Health and wellbeing

Continue reading

Woodland Walk Video

“Troserch Woodland Walk” is a StillWalks video I produced one early morning last Summer.  I was looking through the images from this production recently and found a number that I like but that did not make it into the video. I thought I would showcase them this week, so watch this space!

All StillWalks videos are available to buy as High Definition (HD) downloads. Just click on the Shop drop down menu button. Or you can pay what you like for this video (normal price £3.00) with the donate button below and I will send you a link to download this featured video in HD. Please allow up to 24 hours for delivery of the download link.

Why pay for a StillWalks video? See five good reasons below.

btn_donateCC_LG

Five good reasons to buy a StillWalks video:

  • High Quality Videos 
  • Anytime, anywhere
  • Therapy at your fingertips
  • Watching, Walking and Listening 
  • Health and wellbeing

Continue reading

Layers and Layers – Rocky Strata

The cliffs at Cwm Nash and further along the South Wales coast on the Bristol Channel display some great geological features. It is a popular place to enjoy the breakers as well as the rocks but you have to be cautious about the continually eroding cliffs.

The evidence for this is strewn along the foot of the precipice in various sizes, from small rocks which would still do you some damage, to huge chunks of cliff that must way several tons!

Cwm Nash Cliffs

Cwm Nash Cliffs

Coastal Features

The stony beach at Cwm Nash on the Bristol Channel coast of South Wales is made up of some pretty large stones – it is not shingle! This makes it difficult to walk, but perhaps there is some compensation for this in the amazing flat rock strata at the foot of the cliffs.

To see these you will have to watch the new StillWalks video, “Breakers Walk”, which will be available to view on Saturday. The sights and sounds of the woodland and waves ar, as ever, unique to the time ad place they were recorded.

Cliff top fence

breaker

Tree Tunnels

During our walk through Cwm Nash woodland, I spotted what looked like the entrance to a tunnel. It clearly wasn’t, but the growth pattern and arrangement of the trees growing at the side of the footpath appeared shortly before an actual tree tunnel that would take us out of the woods and towards the sea.

Cwm Nash Woodland

Cwm Nash Woodland

Ruins in the Woods

The ruined stone wall hidden in amongst the trees of Cwm Nash Woods was a surprise find –  for me at least. The wall belongs to an old mill beside the Ffynnon Marl river. The StillWalks production walk I did with Dr Cathy Treadaway as part of the “Walk and Draw for Health and Wellbeing” research project, was done without a recce walk beforehand.

I had been asked to go along with a completely fresh eye (and ear). I don’t normally do this because there are distinct production advantages to checking out the lie of the land beforehand. However, whether the walk is done as a recce or as a production, new surroundings are always exciting to explore and Cwm Nash absolutely “came up to the mark” for me as a new discovery.

Old Mill in Cwm Nash

Cwm Nash Woodland

Ffynnon Marl river