Higgledy Piggledy Patterns

Here is that concertina effect again in the structure and pattern of stanchions underneath Penarth Pier (see Monday’s post). The pattern of uprights is in contrast to the seemingly higgledy piggledy pattern of the cross bars and linkages of the rest of the structure.

Penarth Pier structure

Penarth Pier structure

Underneath the Pier

Exploring underneath Penarth Pier at high tide is not necessarily a good idea. Capturing these alternative views of the pier structure meant I had to leap out of the way of the water at the last moment. As has happened on other occasions, when taking photographs, I forgot about the time I was taking.

Underneath the pier

Underneath the pier

Morning Light

The early morning light on Penarth Pier is not so unusual but the mixture of colours in the sky looking out from Penarth seafront towards Flat Holm and Sleep Holm Islands in the Bristol Channel did strike me as quite weird.

Morning Light

Sea and Sky

Seeing the Sea Wall – A Confusion of Scale

The scale of the sea wall separating Swansea beach and Swansea harbour can be seen here without to much ambiguity. However, when looking from the top end, at its lowest point to the ground, a confusion of scale becomes apparent.

While it seems from the top of the beach that the wall doesn’t “grow” in size much at all, as you walk towards the sea beside the wall, it becomes gradually apparent, until, at its highest point, you realise the true scale of it towering above you. The same effect of space distorted can be seen if you approach the wall “broadside” from a distance along the beach.

It doesn’t matter that I know the scale of the wall and have approached it in this way many time, that strange confusion of scale does its trick on my perception of it every time.

Has anyone else experienced this kind of spacial effect here or anywhere else?

Sea Wall rusty sea wall

Trolley Cemetery and a New View of Drawing

Decaying with time, these old trolleys create a strange cemetery in the mouth of the River Tawe, Swansea.

Those that already follow this blog will know that there is more to come throughout this week to tell the story of a recent walk in the docks/marina area of Swansea.

The walk was the second Mission Gallery Walk and Draw with Sarah Abbott that I have taken part in. On this occasion, while I did a little sketching, most of my drawing was with my DSLR camera, iPhone and small edirol sound recorder.

Having read that the winner of the Jerwood Drawing Prize this year was sound artist  Alison Carlier, I felt that my description of drawing with my camera and sound recorder while out on pre-production recce walks for StillWalks videos, is perfectly valid.

With The Big Draw continuing throughout this month, perhaps it is an appropriate time to consider and enjoy the broadening definition of drawing.

trolleys in sand

trolley in sand

Old fence section

trolley in sand

Pattern in Wood

The fascinating patterns in the wood of this tree stump are, I am sure, partly the result of it spending some significant time in the sea. It would be easy to mistake them for some kind of animal markings or camouflage and claw marks!

patterns in wood

patterns in wood