White Bluebells or Blue Bluebells

Spring is the only season left for me to produce a video from Lower Lliw Reservoir. I am hoping that now that the bluebells are coming out in our garden, there may also be some showing themselves at the reservoir.

I wonder if they will be white bluebells or blue bluebells?

Photos were taken on my iPhone 5c.

Bluebells WhiteBluebells Blue

 

 

At the Mouth of the River

The mouth of the River Lliw is near Loughor on the Loughor Estuary in South Wales. Its width is obviously significantly greater here than at its source and as a consequence, the children of Felindre Primary School could only estimate the width and the depth.

The flow rate of the river could still be measured and this was done by throwing a piece of orange peel into the water and timing it between two points on the river bank. This and much more information will be included in the teaching and learning resource that I will be helping to produce as a part of the Clear Streams project managed by Swansea’s Countryside Connections team.

Measuring the flow

River Lliw at Loughor Estuary

Mouth of River Lliw

Light on Water

It is worth keeping our rivers and streams clean if only for the beautiful effects of sunlight falling on clear water.

The reasoning for the Clear Streams project goes much further than that of course. However, it is still important in my mind, that those taking part in the project appreciate these visual aspects as well as developing their understanding of the environmental aspects.

The orange in the second image was not left in the River Lliw. It was being used as a device for measuring the rate of flow of the river at this second stage through Felindre on its way to the river mouth at Loughor.

Light on Water

Orange in Water

Looking for the Source

The source of the River Lliw is situated up in the hills of the Mawr ward in Swansea, South Wales.

The Clear Streams project being managed by Swansea’s Countryside Connections Team helps people to better understand the responsibility we have towards maintaining the cleanliness of rivers and what we can do maintain them. The project, which I am documenting, is taking school children from four primary schools out to explore the River Lliw from source to mouth. The aim for my part in the project, is to produce a teaching and learning resource for future use by schools and communities.

The scenery at the source is beautiful and so, when the weather is dry, it is a very pleasant work place. The source of the river is not a spring but a point on the hills into which the water of the surrounding slopes drains.

Clear Streams Project

Clear Streams

50 Years and Getting Back to Nature

The moss covered steps in the image below never really had a chance not without the intervention of man. Nature and the tree have been taking their course for 50 years and will not let puny things like concrete get in their way.

There are many different reasons for managing woodland. Whether it be to gain resources for one use or another, or to ensure the ecology of the woodland stays mixed and allows a variety of plants and animals. Either way, we manage woodland for ourselves, not for the woodland or the wildlife.

Left to its own devices, in time a woodland may become a monoculture. Given the sort of time that nature considers a millisecond, but we think of as millennia, who knows what would happen?

If you leave it alone, nature will do just fine by itself. The fact of the matter is, of course, that we are here on the planet and we need to live side by side with the rest of the creatures and plants. For me the key to all our survival is to live side by side and not to try and take over or rule over the natural planet (or ourselves for that matter).

Lifting the path

Talking about the Sweet Chestnut

Dai Morris talking about a Sweet Chestnut tree, one amongst many varieties being planted and managed at Coeden Fach woodland near Swansea, South Wales.

This week’s featured StillWalks video is from the south west of Scotland. This medium resolution full length version will be here all week and will then revert to the sample.

The video above is in 480p quality. You can use the Donate button below to pay however much you want and receive a high quality (720HD) download of this week’s featured StillWalks video – “Coastal Walk – Spring” which features part of the Galloway coastline in Scotland. Click the image above to watch the video. DVD Collections are also available to order in the StillWalks Shop.

Paypal button

Before and After – raw material and finished product

There is a range of wood grown and used at Coeden Fach Woodland.

Here you can see the different stages of material and product with the wood growing, cut and layer in stacks ready for use and then the final product in the form of chairs.

Not all the material in the chairs is the same wood as is evident from the the different colours. My favourite is definitely the dogwood chair with its beautiful range of reds, greens, browns and yellows.

Coeden Fach canes

Coeden Fach canes

Coeden Fach chairs

Dogwood chair

This week’s featured StillWalks video is from the south west of Scotland. This medium resolution full length version will be here all week and will then revert to the sample.

The video above is in 480p quality. You can use the Donate button below to pay however much you want and receive a high quality (720HD) download of this week’s featured StillWalks video – “Coastal Walk – Spring” which features part of the Galloway coastline in Scotland. Click the image above to watch the video. DVD Collections are also available to order in the StillWalks Shop.

Paypal button

Woodland Discoveries

You may expect to find some King Alfred’s Cakes in a woodland that includes Ash trees.

The Coeden Fach woodland area of Bishops Wood, near Swansea had these and other less expected things. We found (were shown) the King Alfred’s Cakes, otherwise known as Cramp Balls, on the fallen branch of an Ash tree. Knowing what to look for after that, we found several more.

Less expected was the beautiful but sad discovery of the grave of Alanna Mary who died just a few days after birth. Near the grave was a sculpture in the form of a wooden dog which clearly took the interest of one of our canine companions.

King Alfred's Cakes

Woodland Shrine

Two Dogs

This week’s featured StillWalks video is from the south west of Scotland. This medium resolution full length version will be here all week and will then revert to the sample.

The video above is in 480p quality. You can use the Donate button below to pay however much you want and receive a high quality (720HD) download of this week’s featured StillWalks video – “Coastal Walk – Spring” which features part of the Galloway coastline in Scotland. Click the image above to watch the video. DVD Collections are also available to order in the StillWalks Shop.

Paypal button