Seeing Through the Rainy Season

If last week’s photo series was about changeable weather, this week’s is about the apparent permanence of moisture during one of the rainy seasons in Wales – there is certainly more than one!

I was recently up on the hills of the Mawr ward near Swansea to assess the conditions for a scheduled project production day . . . what a joke. I couldn’t believe the weather on my journey up there but thought “the weather is so changeable these days, you never know, it might clear“. Ha! Wishful thinking indeed.

Having said that, I had my waterproofs with me and decided it would be good to try and capture something of the atmosphere of the place in these wild conditions. So here is a short accurately descriptive sound clip to accompany the first two images of the week.

Mist and rain on Mawr

Mist and Rain on Mawr

Up On The Downs – Looking at The Worm’s Head

My “story” this week features photos taken earlier this year at a time when the weather was as changeable as it is now in Autumn. The Worm’s Head, a spit of rock at the end of Gower Peninsula, is seen here from a vantage point up on Rhossili Downs – why are they called Downs?

The weather throughout the day, as can be seen below, changed from hazy but bright sunshine to overcast cloud with a threatening mist. At times the colour was strong with a blu sky, at others it almost disappeared, hence the monochrome image at the bottom.

Click the images to enlarge.

Worms Head

Worms Head

Worms Head

Up On The Downs – Looking at The Worm's Head

My “story” this week features photos taken earlier this year at a time when the weather was as changeable as it is now in Autumn. The Worm’s Head, a spit of rock at the end of Gower Peninsula, is seen here from a vantage point up on Rhossili Downs – why are they called Downs?

The weather throughout the day, as can be seen below, changed from hazy but bright sunshine to overcast cloud with a threatening mist. At times the colour was strong with a blu sky, at others it almost disappeared, hence the monochrome image at the bottom.

Click the images to enlarge.

Worms Head

Worms Head

Worms Head

Black and White Bird in a Colour Landscape

Colour is almost not there in this Black Headed Gull but there is colour in the landscape below. The bottom image  shows both the colour and lack of colour in the Loughor Estuary landscape on this particular day.

My monochrome post about this place earlier this week was prompted by the lack of colour in the estuary at the time those photos were taken. This image proves the difference under light and shade on a day of changeable weather.

Black Headed Gull

River Lliw

Monochrome Estuary

The river Lliw reaches the sea in the Loughor Estuary. The photos I took below were of course originally in colour. On the day they were taken, however, the weather was such that the colour of the landscape did not reveal itself much from this particular angle  shot. All hues were muted and yet there was plenty of contrast between land and sky.

More “Monochrome Madness” can be seen on Leanne Cole’s photography blog.

Loughor Estuary

River Lliw

Starting at the Source

Looking for the source of the River Lliw on the Mawr upland area of Swansea, we started our search near another source. This is a beautiful area of  South Wales where there are a few quiet, still days in the year but mostly it is windy.

Mawr Upland

wind turbine

Hazy Day – A Local Landscape

We hadn’t had rain in this area for a while when I took these photos of the landscape around Swansea. I don’t know if it was atmospheric conditions, pollution or simply dust in the air, but it is not uncommon to have hazy days like this in South Wales, regardless of its reputation for continuous rain!

Swansea landscape

Telegraph Poles