New or Old – Sepia Comparisons

It was the patterns and textures to be seen on my walk this week through the woodlands of Stainton, Middlesbrough, that prompted me to try making some sepia comparisons to the normal colour shots I took on my iPhone 6s. Often a sepia effect is used in photography to present an impression of age or times past. Because of the effect time can have on photographic paper combined with the fact that, pre-colour photography, there were not many options to producing the image in monochrome, the effect, produced digitally today, seems a fair one to employ to gain the effect of age.

ground level woodland

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Arrangement of Trees

Whether established or more recently planted to extend the woodland further, the arrangement of trees in Stainton Woodland where I enjoyed my walk this week, can only be described as formal. Reminiscent of the French penchant for arboreal pattern, there would be a closer match to their taste if the trees themselves were of a different species.

For whatever reason the obvious pattern of the trees seen from different angles prompted me to experiment with desaturation, monochrome and sepia effects when reviewing the images.

I am sorry I cannot tell you the names of these trees but I am given the impression that they are not going to grow to a huge scale. However, if I visit again in another ten or twenty years, perhaps I will be proved wrong.

woodland walk

Into the Interior

The second area of woodland I enjoyed on my walk this week is just a few yards across the road from the first in Stainton, Middlesbrough, but it is quite different. Walking into the interior it becomes clear (though not from these three photos) that the woodland was planned and the arrangement of trees is distinct.

This was the first time I walked in these woods for a number of years – the last time being not long after many of the trees had been planted, so it was good to see how the woodland environment had developed. Naturally there is little or no grass growing in the interior of the wood and this is reflected in the texture of the sound of my footsteps in the sound clip below.

woodland entrance

woodland interior

woodland texture

Stainton Woods

Autumnal Growth

Leaving one woodland and entering the next on my walk this week, I noted something of the variety of trees and their Autumnal growth. From red hawthorn berries to acorns, apples and brambles (blackberries). The brambles appeared early this year but it wasn’t too late to enjoy some of those I found on my walk in the woods at Stainton in north east England – the best were beautifully sweet and juicy!

hawthorn

My Walk this Week – Suburban Woodlands

My walk this week features two different suburban woodlands which are very close to each other and through which I have not walked for a number of years. They have developed in the meantime.

The woods are in Stainton, on the outskirts of Middlesbrough in the north east of England. As with any conurbation there was the constant background sound of traffic but as the woods edge farm fields, there was also the thrum of a tractor engine throughout my walk. Neither of these things detracted from the sound of the birds oe my footsteps on the varying surfaces of the woodland. You may gather from this that my walk this week does have some sound clips to accompany the images and a short soundscape at the the end of the week.

All photographs and sound clips throughout my walk this week were made using my iPhone 6s.

stainton-woods-1

Stainton Woods

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Kunsthuis Gallery and Garden – Reviewing the Walk

Looking back at my walk this week I thoroughly enjoyed our visit to Kunsthuis Gallery, it’s garden and cafe. We’ll be back again there in November as well to attend an exhibition opening in which Julie Brunskill has a collection of her ceramic work. The garden will look different by then as it will be late Autumn rather than late Summer. While our focus will be on the exhibition, I may try to get some more photos of the garden to compare to those below and if so, I will make a point of recording the sounds of the garden as well. Sorry there is no soundscape for this weeks walk.

Garden Path

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Art in the Garden

The gardens at Kunsthuis round which I have been walking this week, have a number of different works of art. It’s up to you what you make of them either from these photos or if you visit the place yourself.

burnt to a cinder

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Twizzle in the Vegetable Patch

Amongst the other elements of the gardens I have been looking at on my walk this week at Kunsthuis Gallery in North East England, there is a colourful vegetable garden. The natural twizzle stick below belongs to an orange squash, so all that’s needed now is tequila and grenadine and we’ll be on the way to a sunrise (please excuse my daft humour). The gardens at Kunsthuis are not as extensive as many other public gardens but they have managed to pack a lot in.

natural twizzle

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