A Natural End to Summer

My walk this week took place at the end of September which this year means it was still a Summer walk as the temperatures were so unusually high. But we are now in the full sway of Autumn and I would be unlikely to see this red admiral butterfly or any of the other natural details of this walk in quite the same way, if at all, were I to return to Port Eynon now at the end of October.

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

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Viewing from Port Eynon Point

My walk this week with the Taste of Gower walkers had a high point above Port Eynon where, from the cliffs, we were able to see miles across the Bristol Channel and out to sea. It was a beautiful day and the sun glinted off the turquoise water while I took in the patterns of rock in the bay below.

viewpoint

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Musket View from the Salt House

Having returned from the Horton and Port Eynon RNLI station, we set off again in the opposite direction for this Taste of Gower walk and visited The Old Salt House which stands on the rocks at the southern end of the beach. Originally used, as the name suggests, to harvest sea salt, the building is now in ruins but has an interesting history which can be read at the link above.

salt house window

View from a musket loop in The Salt House at Port Eynon

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Getting Stuck on the Worm’s Head

Firstly I should say that this has not happened to me! However, people getting cut off by the tide and stuck on the Worm’s Head at the end of the Gower Peninsula is a regular occurrence and one which requires the RNLI to launch their boat from the Port Eynon station to rescue them. During last month’s Taste of Gower walk we called in at the local RNLI station for a talk by one of their members.

taste-of-gower-port-eynon-walk-35

The next ToG walk is this coming Friday and will be at Rhossili from where we will be able to look out to the Worm’s Head as we walk out along the cliffs. This is also a fundraising walk for The Old Mill Foundation.

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Smiling Faces or Stony Faces at Port Eynon

My walk this week at Port Eynon with the Taste of Gower walkers revealed some smiling faces . . . or perhaps I should say stony faces!

smiling faces

Looking directly into the light on from the beach at Port Eynon produced a smile on my own face. We are told not to face into the sun when taking photos because the light will be behind the subject and so they will appear as a silhouette. But if the subject is the light itself and the effect of being dazzled by it, then go for it (not directly at the the sun of course – that can be dangerous).

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My Walk this Week – Port Eynon

My walk this week is from the last Taste of Gower outing to Port Eynon on the Gower Peninsula.It was a bright day with a bit of a breeze as can be heard on the sound clips I’ll be posting. We gathered at the Captain’s Table as a starting point for the walk and I enjoyed seeing the late display of wildflowers as we approached the beach to amble, stride or march along the sand towards Horton.

Port Eynon

We had all come prepared for changeable weather but were lucky to keep the sunshine for almost the whole of the walk. We weren’t the only ones enjoying it either!

The next ToG walk will be this Friday at Rhossili – details here.

 

A Sense of Place – Reviewing the Walk

One of the main things I try to do with “My Walk this Week” is to give a sense of the place I have been walking. Usually the inclusion of soundscapes helps to provide this (I hope), but I do not always do any field recoding. The advice given to me prior to our day out in Edinburgh was to simply try and get a sense of the place. This we did so far as we were able within the time available and it was much enjoyed.

The Helix, which we visited on the way home to see the Kelpies, was also worth the extra mileage. I think that this final image of their huge heads appearing as if from the ground begins to give a sense of a place where you are forced to reassess your surroundings due to the unfamiliar scale of a familiar creature.

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No Excuses – Photography and Memory

I have posted a total of 14 images of The Kelpies as part of my walk this week and that may well be too many for most of you. However, I have reviewed them sequentially on a number of occasions in posting to this blog and found that they serve me with a good memory. There are aspects of our visit to The Helix, specifically to see these sculptural installations in the Scottish landscape, that I am pleased to have enhanced by the images. The fall of changing light as the sun began to set, the details of pattern and reflection in the structures and a hint at the true scale of the work in relation to myself and the surrounding landscape.

So for those who read these posts as well as those who only look at the images, I make no excuses for the number of photos of these magnificent horses and recommend that if you get the chance, they are worth a visit.

The Kelpies

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