Up On The Downs – Looking at The Worm’s Head

My “story” this week features photos taken earlier this year at a time when the weather was as changeable as it is now in Autumn. The Worm’s Head, a spit of rock at the end of Gower Peninsula, is seen here from a vantage point up on Rhossili Downs – why are they called Downs?

The weather throughout the day, as can be seen below, changed from hazy but bright sunshine to overcast cloud with a threatening mist. At times the colour was strong with a blu sky, at others it almost disappeared, hence the monochrome image at the bottom.

Click the images to enlarge.

Worms Head

Worms Head

Worms Head

Up On The Downs – Looking at The Worm's Head

My “story” this week features photos taken earlier this year at a time when the weather was as changeable as it is now in Autumn. The Worm’s Head, a spit of rock at the end of Gower Peninsula, is seen here from a vantage point up on Rhossili Downs – why are they called Downs?

The weather throughout the day, as can be seen below, changed from hazy but bright sunshine to overcast cloud with a threatening mist. At times the colour was strong with a blu sky, at others it almost disappeared, hence the monochrome image at the bottom.

Click the images to enlarge.

Worms Head

Worms Head

Worms Head

Looking at the View – Swansea Bay

Looking in opposite directions from the middle of Swansea Bay cycle / foot path, you see Mumbles lighthouse and RNLI lifeboat station in the west and Meridian Tower by the maritime quarter in the east.

Swansea Bay Mumbles

Swansea Bay

A Blistering Day in Swansea Bay

The heat and dazzling brightness of the sun kept me in the shade of the woods on my walk along the cycle/foot path of Swansea Bay. This section of the path from Swansea to Mumbles allowed me to look out from the comfortable temperatures under the trees. The blurred focus in the distance of these photos is not just the result of my use of the camera – it was also pretty hazy with the heat.

Swansea Bay

Swansea Bay

Swansea Bay

Swansea Bay

A Pirate Laid To Rest

The skull and crossbones gravestone is just one of the things that makes the old graveyard at Kirkandrews on the Galloway coast in SW Scotland is a fascinating place.

There are thousands of wrecks around the coastline of Britain but pirates did not usually merit a marked grave in the local cemetery. This one must have held some honour amongst the locals!

There are a number of other interesting gravestones in the cemetery, some of which have faces, others have intriguing patterns and motifs.

pirate's gravestone