shadow pattern

My Walk this Week 131 – Sticks Shadows and Shapes

The sun created some interesting shadows on my walk this week along the beach in Swansea Bay. Light, as sculptor, had worked with the conditions left by the weather previous to the ebb of the tide. The materials were clusters of sticks and scattered individual twigs. The art created was both three and two dimensional and the one without the other would not, could not, have had the effect on shape and form that the specific conditions provided.

stick perspective

It was the clusters of sticks that initially interested me, gathered together as though they were abandoned nests. On noticing these and then an individual stick and its shadow, I couldn’t help but notice more and more of them. Continue reading

Sea lines

Light and Lines

By the end of my walk this week on Aberavon Beach the light had brightened to the point of dazzlement. We didn’t have a blue sky but the sunlight was bleaching in its brightness and the heat was clearly making a dip in the sea an attractive option for many.

a day on the beach

Having walked the length of the beach, we turned around and walked back along the promenade where I found myself noticing some of the lines and anglesContinue reading

Swansea urban scene

Urban Walk – Second Side of the Triangle

Looking at some of the patterns and features on my triangular urban walk this week, the second side of the triangle provided me with a number of everyday aspects of the city with, to me, points of visual interest. The angles and perspectives of architectural features, when looked at on their own and viewed without the context of the wider urban environment, become simply lines, shapes and patterns and can be seen as works of abstract art.

angled steps

Those lines and shapes are reflected in the design of murals on the walls of the Elysium artists’ studios but opposite this is an apparent anomaly – Continue reading

fence perspective

My Walk this Week – An Angle on Nature and Construction

My walk this week was slightly unexpected. I had gone to explore the docks area in Swansea Bay but found no access due to gates and security fencing. However, as I moved on I found a footpath edging a part of Swansea University Bay Campus still under construction. On one side of the path I enjoyed the effect of perspective on the site fence, while on the other the textures I found in the bare nature of the season.

Winter nature

So while I had expected an industrial walk in the docks, instead I got a mixture of nature and man made construction. The nature was partly in the form of a bitterly cold wind for whichContinue reading

sand surface

My Walk this Week and the Influence of Angle

My walk this week is one I have taken many times but as always, the conditions are different every time. On this occasion it was the angle from which I was viewing things that had a strong the influence on my photography of the walk.

beach love

For instance, it may be obvious to many of you what the image above shows, but as I passed by on Swansea Bay’s wonderful expansive beach, for some reason I thought to myself, “That’s a funny thing to draw in shells on the beach” – I thought it looked like a boot! (I know, don’t ask! Lol). Continue reading

Reflections, Angles and Timing

The photo below does not show the “Elysi m Galley”. It shows the building which houses artists’ studios which are part of the Elysium Gallery with the gallery itself being down the street and round the corner (so to speak). If I had chosen a different angle I might have been able to capture the whole name.

I found an angle In the photo sequence below to capture a reflected conversation in the street but the timing of my walk this week proved a bit rubbish – it was rubbish collection day and inevitably the gulls had taken advantage and managed to spill some of it across the pavement.

Elysium Gallery

I like the mixture of signage and reflection on the doorway shot and although I cannot remember what the shop is open for, looking at the details I can see that they are advertising English lessons. And thinking of languages, the trees lining the street in the last image, and their bark, remind me of France and the profusion of plane trees they have lining so many of their streets.

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City Patterns

Walking around Belfast revealed many fascinating structures in the architecture. The camera can be a very useful tool when it comes to focusing on aspects of buildings that create fascinating patterns when isolated from their surroundings. The patterns are there anyway but it is not always easy to pick them out amongst the complexity of their surroundings. Sometimes, of course, it is a combination of structures seen from a particular angle that does the trick.

Belfast City patterns

City Sounds 2

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Angular Starting Points

The starting point for a recent walk around Cardiff Bay can be seen below in some of the angular architecture of the area. The architecture may be one of the things that Cardiff Bay is known for but my walk this week, which took us across the barrage, will be taking an alternative look at the area and some of the features that caught my attention.

The materials of the building in the background of the second photo prove it to be the same one as is in the first shot. You may be able to tell that the first image was taken at a different time to the second as is shown by the change in weather. It’s the bird I particularly like in this photo, and the red triangle of the footbridge in the second one, or perhaps I should say the context of these elements of the images.

Cardiff Bay-16

Cardiff Bay architecture

Architectural Patterns

Vertical, horizontal and diagonal lines, circles, squares, rectangles – these are the elements that make up the structures of so much, if not all architecture. Add in a bit of colour and some more angles and curves and the combinations of pattern are endless.

Symmetry seems sometimes to be a prerequisite in architectural design but it is when asymmetry is used that things get really exciting and no doubt, from the architects point of view, prohibitively expensive.

Personally, I don’t have a problem with the look of these buildings in Swansea’s maritime Quarter – there are plenty of those pattern combinations to be discovered. I do, however, think that it is a shame that imagination seems to come at a price.

Swansea Maritime Quarter

Swansea Maritime Quarter