Marsh grass

Crossing the Marshes

Having left the park on my walk this week across the marshes and down to the river, the wild flowers were out and the birds were singing in the sunshine.

There were the usual items of flotsam as well of course, brought up by the tide – that’s why these are salt marshes. Continue reading

Castell Ddu – Reviewing the Walk

Returning to my starting point in my local park on my walk this week, I had a last glimpse of the marshes on the Loughor Estuary. The light was still strong as there was not a cloud to be seen and the air was clear.

Reviewing the walk, I am reminded that although I have called it the Castell Ddu Walk, the castle, or what remains of it does not feature in the images other than the related nearby motte situated at the side of the motorway. The link and quoted text below gives some information on the place.

looking across the marshes

Continue reading

My Walk this Week – Winter Frost and Sunshine

My walk this week is one with winter frost and sunshine in abundance – it was very enjoyable. I did not have the inclination to climb on this particular morning and so took to the local park and from there headed down to the river. The tide was not high and there was little or no wind so the river Loughor and its marshy estuary were still and bright.

River Loughor and swan

Continue reading

Evening Landscape – Reviewing the Walk

This evening landscape at the end of my walk this week in Penclawdd on the North Gower coast was not really very late in the day – just after 4pm. The days seem so short at this time of day, but I must try to remember those further north who, if you go far enough north, see no real sunlight at all through the day. I cannot imagine what that is like.

evening landscape

The sounds of this walk include many of the activities of the place, both man-made and natural. It was good to find myself hidden from the traffic and industry so easily by such a low lying shield of land as I walked at the edge of the salt marsh.

Enjoy the sounds along with selected images from my walk below.

Penclawdd Walk Soundscape

Continue reading

Taste of Gower, Penclawdd – Reviewing the Walk

To mark the end of each Taste of Gower walk we visit a local cafe, hence the name “Taste of Gower”. The Gower Landscape Partnership pays for the teas and coffees but there are always many other good things to be eaten as well, and that was no less the case for the Cariad Cafe in Penclawdd as it is for any of the other Taste of Gower walk locations.

The next Taste of Gower walk will be at Port Eynon on Friday 30th September (that’s next week). Details can be found here.

Cariad Cafe

Cup of tea time at Cariad Cafe

Click play button below and then the first of the thumbnail images to view selected photos from the past week’s posts in sequence.

Taste of Gower – Penclawdd Soundscape

If viewing this in an email, please click the post title to see other photos in this post, thank you.

 

Back Down at Sea Level

With the weather still fine towards the end of my walk this week with the Taste of Gower walkers at Penclawdd, the blue paint of this local boat almost perfectly matched the sky.

Blue boat

Taking It All In – Looking All Around

On the Taste of Gower walks people don’t usually stop to look and listen to their surroundings. However, once we got up on top of the hill above Penclawdd, the views are in almost all directions are wonderful and the group could help but stop and gather to take it all in.

On a clear day like this, looking south and south west you can see the rest of the Gower Peninsula and across the Burry Inlet to Pembrokeshire in the distance. Looking west you see Llanelli, Burry Port and Carmarthenshire and looking north and north west you see as far as The Black Mountain.

Taste of Gower walkers

Taste of Gower walkers

Closer to hand were other sights such as a circling buzzard and evidence that the tide was coming in rather than ebbing – the birds on the sand bank in the middle of the estuary were getting more and more crowded as we continued on our walk.

Overlooking Penclawdd

If viewing this in an email, please click the post title to see other photos in this post, thank you.

Following the Footpath

Following the footpath on my walk this week with the Taste of Gower walkers took us up the hill above the village and between houses which, when we rose above them, revealed views of the Penclawdd vista over the Loughor Estuary.

There were plenty of details to see along the way with both man made and natural antenna presenting themselves in the forms of a radio ham aerial and the long pink arms of abundant rosebay willow herb.

Penclawdd vista

Penclawdd vista

If viewing this in an email, please click the post title to see other photos in this post, thank you.

One Man and His Dog

On my walk this week with the Taste of Gower walkers there were quite a sizeable group of people. This made one man and his dog out walking on the marshes all the more noticable.

I have commented before on my interest in texture (it comes from my original training in tapestry weaving – see my other website here) and it is perhaps this interest that makes me notice and photograph the patterns of grass or wood as I have in the images below.

One man and his dog

One man and his dog

I also enjoy the aural textures and patterns that surround us in any environment but I was amused by the rhythm of walking that can be heard in the sound clip below.

Squeaky Shoes

If viewing this in an email, please click the post title to see other photos in this post, thank you.

My Walk this Week – Taste of Gower, Penclawdd

My walk this week is from the last Taste of Gower walk that took place at Penclawdd on the North Gower coast overlooking the Loughor Estuary, its salt marshes and Burry Inlet.

As can be seen in the first image below, it was a beautiful day. Starting from the car park overlooking the salt marshes with the tide out, we were guided on the walk by Rod Cooper who talked to us about the industrial history of Penclawdd and its heyday with the copper works. The river Loughor apparently takes a different route now to what it did in the days of the copper works. At that time there was a harbour at Penclawdd which would have been necessary for the industry. That was back in the 18th and 19th centuries. Now it is all salt marsh and of course the benefit of that is the salt marsh lamb that is so tasty.

Salt Marshes

If viewing this in an email, please click the post title to see other photos in this post, thank you.