bare branches

My Walk this Week 138 – Another Quarry Walk Through Time

My walk this week is to another quarry but one that is quite different from that which I explored last week. The rock is not black this time but the sides are steep and I cannot imagine how the writer of the graffiti, still to be faintly seen near the top of the quarry face, got up there. Nor can I make out what is written as time and weather has done its work and taken most of it away.

Dantwyn Quarry

It is 35 years since I first explored this place in my local countryside and I guess the plants and trees have grown up since then. I certainly remember it being more open back then, whereas now the small footpath leading through to the pool at the foot of the rock face is kept open only by a few dog walkers and young people playing on bikes, sitting round a bonfire or perhaps writing some more graffiti.

Dantwyn Quarry Soundscape

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platform 3 floor sign

Superbug or Pokemon on Platform 3

It’s not really a superbug or Pokemon on Platform 3 of course, but my walk this week around York railway station offered me a view of a number of different trains and this was the front of one of the local commuter versions. Looking at the face of the train on its own, I thought it had a distinctly cartoon character.

superbug or train

The train I was due to meet was to arrive at Platform 3, but search as I did, I could not find the platform . . . at first. The York station environment is very busy and it can be difficult to identify one thing amongst many.Continue reading

new growth

Alternative Details – Route Taken or Root Taken

Having looked at some of the natural details on the short walk home with my niece (see previous post), we then started looking at some of the alternative details of our surroundings. The patterns created by dirt and moisture in the air and by the remains of roots on surfaces along our route.

remains of growth

This route took us past the dry crinkled textures of a brown beech hedge and onto a parking area where my niece said all she could see was cars and vans. So we took a closer lookContinue reading

A lifetime of cars

My Walk this Week – Travelling in Time

My walk this week is a little bit abstract in walking terms. There was some actual walking involved but I will get to that later in the week. Today I want to walk back in time first of all to 1915 and then 1942 and 1963.

by Alastair Duncan 1942

by Alastair Duncan 1942

In York recently I added a few items to my growing archive of images of my family. My intention is to digitise them over time but there is a huge collection going back many years.

Below are two photos of my Grandfather (known as Tiger) – one from each end of his life. It can be seen that in 1915 he was a soldier and in 1963 he was an artist. The next photo is of my namesake, Alastair, who died of septicaemia in 1942 – from the art and design work he had done that year at school, it can be seen that there was the potential for him also to go into the arts.

An finally another reference to travelling in time – a list of all the cars my father has had from the first to the last.

strata triangles

Living Rocks

Living rocks – you can take that term any way you like!

Yellow lichen

If “living rocks” refers to rocks living, then I guess evolving might be a better term in that they are changing over time albeit slowly. But as an environment for growth Continue reading

Dorset Wind – Reviewing the Walk

Dorset walk

My walk this week has been from June 2012 and features the Dorset wind. I don’t know to what extent the wind has been apparent to anyone viewing the photos for this walk that I have posted through the week, but the soundscape below should give a sense of time as well as place. Continue reading

Forest Formation

Forest formation

My walk this week is from 2010 but the post title “Forest Formation” does not refer to the past of the trees so much as the rocky ridge feature near the footpath that I often like to sit on and soak up the atmosphere of the place. Continue reading

New or Old – Sepia Comparisons

It was the patterns and textures to be seen on my walk this week through the woodlands of Stainton, Middlesbrough, that prompted me to try making some sepia comparisons to the normal colour shots I took on my iPhone 6s. Often a sepia effect is used in photography to present an impression of age or times past. Because of the effect time can have on photographic paper combined with the fact that, pre-colour photography, there were not many options to producing the image in monochrome, the effect, produced digitally today, seems a fair one to employ to gain the effect of age.

ground level woodland

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